Conservation Commission

The Huntington Conservation Commission’s purpose is to educate the public regarding conservation issues, assist the Development Review Board, Planning Commission, and Selectboard in conservation matters, conduct studies and publish information on natural resources, and review proposals for Conservation Reserve Funds. A detailed description of the “Powers and Duties of Conservation Commissions” can be found in the Vermont Statutes listed below.

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Ad-Hoc Committee:
EAB has been discovered in both Richmond and Bristol – which now makes Huntington an “EAB hot spot.” The committee has completed an inventory of ash trees on Town property and within town road rights-of-way and produced the Emerald Ash Borer Preparedness Plan for the Town of Huntington.

Meetings:
The Huntington Conservation Commission meets the 2nd Thursday of every month.
Meeting Information

Pollinator Protection for Municipal Property
In June 2022 the Selectboard unanimously endorsed a resolution that municipal properties and easements in Huntington shall be free or nearly free of pesticidal agents.

Planning for the Future of the Texas Hill Buyout Property
Through a FEMA buyout due to severe landslide erosion, the Town has acquired the property at 266/288 Texas Hill Road. The Conservation Commission will be coordinating efforts to determine a FEMA-acceptable “open space” plan to present to the Selectboard. Planning documents are available here.

Conservation Commission Members (all 4 year terms):
  • Jeannette Segale (co-chair, term expires 2024)
  • Jennifer Esser (co-chair, term expires 2023)
  • Josh Burns (term expires 2026)
  • Anne Dannenberg (term expires 2023)
  • Al Homans (term expires 2026)
  • Diane Reynolds (term expires 2026)
  • Guthrie Smith (term expires 2026)
  • Simon Schreier (clerk)
Conservation Commission News:

Click here to access Conservation Commission documents for the proposed Town Community Forest, December 2019.

Dragonflies & Damselflies of the Green Mt. Audubon Nature Center
Finding more species diversity than anticipated, Wally Jenkins has been studying the Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) in Huntington since 2008.

Become a Salamander Crossing Guard Volunteer
Learn the details about what crossing guard volunteers do, how data is collected, and how to get involved in this important project to help ensure the long-term survival of vernal pool breeding amphibians

To learn more about salamander crossings and amphibian monitoring, including species identification and othe tips, check out the following websites:

For information on all the reptiles and amphibians in the State of Vermont, check out the “Herp Atlas”.

Huntington Conservation Fund

Conservation Fund applications, past and present, can be found in the documents section below.

External Links:

Birds of Vermont Museum
Green Mountain Audubon Society
Huntington Historical and Community Trust
Huntington River Water Quality
Keeping Track


Conservation Commission Documents